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20121101
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of the possibility of a cease-fire. hamas officials say, in fact, it would have been announced hours ago in cairo. clearly, that's not happening. there's no sign of a cease-fire. in fact, certainly, if you look -- if we go back over the last few hours, five or six hours, it's been an evening of fairly intense fire, not only incoming israeli air strikes, but just a little while ago, we saw two rockets being launched also from this area behind me. and certainly by the looks of those rockets, and we're getting very good at recognizing them, some of them do appear to be these so-called 5 rockets, which have a fairly long range, rockets fired in the direction of tel aviv and jerusalem. also today, one of those rockets falling to the south near the settlement block in the west bank. and another building, an israeli building a town outside tel aviv on the road to jerusalem. so we've seen a fairly intense evening, certainly, of violence here, incoming, as well as outgoing. and all this talk about a ceasefire and discussions in cairo and elsewhere don't seem to be amounting to much at this time. now, toda
are the greatest defender of the arab cause, which is the palestinian cause. and it works. go to cairo, to the shops of cairo, and you will see photographs of ahmadinejad, an iranian leader. why? because he stands up for the palestinians. that's the game the iranians play, and my guess is the more horrible the pictures are out of gaza the more there is a sense of this massive drift of power between israel and the palestinians. the more iran will be seen as one of the few countries that is willing to really stand up and speak against the west and, you know, they have, as you know, very colorful rhetoric, but that's all geared towards this regional gain where they're almost outwitting the arab against the palestinians. >> let me veer off to israel for a moment. benjamin netanyahu is up for reelection soon. how much do you think what's happening now, this rousing with gaza, does or doesn't have anything to do with him? >> we have to hope this has nothing to do with that because this is a very serious business. not only is he taking his own country into a military operation, he is risking
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
the professor can speak in free times from cairo now is an indication that freedom of speech is still very much alive in egypt and also an indication that mubarak is no longer in power and you know, morsi is dependent on the u.s. for aid. dependent on the imf. international opinion will not allow for mubarak, for morsi to consolidate power around him. >> you said mubarak. >> freudian slip. >> what do you think about that? is morsi a long away way from being an islamist dictatdictato? >> in terms of expression, i could speak to you three and four years ago from cairo and freely as i have done just right now and i did speak several times. criticizing measures and policies took and put forward by the president and his government. so in terms of freedom of expression, it's not a huge leap, but let me remind you as well of the fact that at least one chairman was closed in the last weeks in a step which we considered egypt to be negatively imposing a democratic limit on tv channels. however, if we sustain checks and balances, in the moments in which do not have a branch of government, and morsi is th
-moon arrived in cairo just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since last wednesday ch ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. how are civilians dealing with this conflict? the numbers are frightening. >> reporter: they're not dealing very well with it. it's a very difficult situation. you have to keep in mind, erin, that here in gaza, they don't have early warning systems. they don't have bomb shelters. they don't have an iron dome system to protect them. so, they feel very exp
, in the hour and a half between the time the announcement was made in cairo and the cease-fire went into effect, we saw increasing numbers of israeli air strikes, artillery barrages into gaza city itself. some of them quite close to where i'm standing. and we saw three separate volley of rockets fired from gaza city toward israel. it did seem as if they were working against the clock to get just a few last whips in or hits in to the other side before the cease-fire went into effect. when it did go into effect, it became very calm, very quiet. then we started to hear celebratory gunfire coming from a bit of the distance from here. but it came closer and closer and we saw more and more cars out on the street. more than we've seen now for the last eight days for quite some time. there were very few cars out. definitely after dark, hardly any. but it went very quickly from pretty quiet to very noisy here in gaza city. >> can you talk about celebratory, some people celebrating that it's over and they could live their lives and they weren't afraid. others possibly celebrating they thought they scored
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
months of stalemate, signs of real change and movement on the ground. >> thank you and now to cairo, where president morsi's move to fast track a new constitution is being met with resistance. some say it's a way to diffuse anger to expand his presidential powers and weaken the judiciary, but critics say he's hijacking the constitution. >> erin, today, a special panel voted to approve a draft of e gipsa's new constitution. egyptians will vote yes or not despite objections by factions who say the process was pushed through by islamists who tried to squeeze out the moderates. in a rejected claims that he was being a dictator. >> translator: there is no room to speak of dictatorship. as an egyptian, i have suffered a lot of the lack of democracy, absence of democracy and dictatorship and corruption in my land, and this dictatorship you are talking about does not exist. >> reporter: the president says if egyptians do not like the constitution, they can vote no on the nationwide referendum. we'll see if that calms down his critics. erin? >>> now our fifth story "outfront" 80 days since t
change and movement on the ground. erin? >> thank you, nick. >>> now to cairo, where president morsi's move to fast track the new constitution is being met with resistance. some say it's a way to defuse anger over morsi's decree to expand his presidential powers and weaken the judiciary but critics say he's hijacking the constitution. october 4th because of security concerns. they say they weren't going to put agents in harm's way, they were worried. cnn as you know went to the compound before, found the ambassador's journal. by the time the fbi got there, would all the evidence have been compromised or -- >> sure. i mean, in an arson when a building burns down, it's a crime that consumes its own evidence. what the fbi needs to break a case like this is an informant. many informants. but in the old days they would put a wanted poster up in a post office. you can put it on the internet now. what will break a case like this is money. they can't put a suitcase full of cash on the table. cia could do that. >> and we would assume the cia is doing that, right? obviously as we all now are a
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)